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Tag: City Innovation

One Permitting Platform. Five Opportunities for City Success.

Whether in a small, rural town of 7,000 or a large, metropolitan city experiencing a boom in development and population growth, many city leaders are surprised to learn how deeply impactful permitting processes can be on a number of important initiatives.  

But, after uncovering just how integral the permitting and licensing processes are to growth opportunities and fostering a sense of community, it’s no surprise that making a one-time upgrade to a cloud-based permitting solution like ViewPoint Cloud can pay big dividends across five critical areas.

1. Attract More Community Development Opportunities

The easier it is for contractors, business owners, and developers to quickly understand  the permitting and licensing process in your community, the more likely they are to apply for them. The faster your team is then able to process and approve those applications, the more revenue and growth you have to invest back into your city. 

2. Streamline Inspections

When homeowners or contractors are waiting on inspector approval before a project can proceed, every additional hour spent waiting could be costing money. Online scheduling features provide constituents with a sense of control over the process, while tools to help inspectors optimize their daily routes allow for maximum efficiency. 

3. Increase Constituent Satisfaction

Because permitting requirements vary from application to application, many constituents find they have questions throughout the process. Online application portals guiding applicants through requirements can eliminate superfluous phone calls and cut down on the number of trips to city hall. 

4. Environmental Sustainability

Online permitting requires no paper. Access to a 24/7 public application portal means constituents don’t have to get in their cars or use public transit to get to town hall, reducing emissions and city pollution. 

5. Make Smarter Decisions for Community Policy

Many communities track how many permits are processed annually and how much revenue is generated from the corresponding fees charged to applicants. Unfortunately, too many communities still do this manually, or are unable to access this data because it’s too cumbersome to report on. ViewPoint Cloud’s reporting function automatically generates reports designed to answer your biggest permitting questions. More information gives leaders insight into successes and improvement opportunities to better shape public policy. 

Our latest infographic shares five important city goals that a cloud-based permitting platform like ViewPoint Cloud can help you achieve.

Are you ready to bring permitting online? Talk with our team.

The Secret to Digital Permitting Adoption: The Technology Help Kiosk

Thanks to technology, modern life is becoming increasingly efficient. Companies like ParkMobile provide apps for parking to help you avoid waiting in a queue (or worse, paying with actual coins). Shopping services like AmazonFresh will deliver household items to your door on a predetermined schedule. And now, ViewPoint Cloud has even improved local government services by bringing the entire permitting experience online with customizable automation software.

But as with any new technology, it’s crucial to understand how adoption comes into play. Technology can’t work unless people first understand it, and then utilize it. That’s why we’re sharing strategies from two different cities using technology help kiosks inside of city hall to increase constituent adoption of ViewPoint Cloud’s permitting automation technology.

What Is a Technology Help Kiosk?

A technology help kiosk can be a simple computer, laptop, or table designated solely for constituents to use online city services.

By design, kiosks are inexpensive and instructive, offering an astoundingly practical solution for time-strapped teams (which is to say, all teams in local government). They can be self-service, but more often are utilized as a way to guide customers through certain transactions or processes.

The concept isn’t new—they’ve been used in airports, grocery stores, and parking structures for decades. The application for providing access to new software to all constituents, however, is a genius example of how far dedicated public servants are willing to go to ensure everyone in their community has equal access to emerging technology.

The technology help kiosk from Town of Bolton, Massachusetts, which is used to increase constituent adoption of ViewPoint Cloud and answer permitting application questions.

Why Use of Kiosks is On the Rise in Local Government

For many communities considering bringing permitting processes online, one of the major hesitations in making the investment in ViewPoint Cloud is whether or not community members will understand how to use the public-facing storefronts to submit permit and license applications. Technology help kiosks offer the simplest path to adoption with two major benefits.

First, they increase technology equity by assisting populations with limited access or comfort with technology. The City of Wooster, Ohio, for example, sits 50 miles south of Cleveland, just north of Holmes County, which contains “the second largest Amish community after Lancaster, Pennsylvania,” according to Tim Monea, Chief Building Official. 

“There are a large number of Amish contractors using ViewPoint Cloud via the kiosk in our department lobby. Additionally, there are others who ask for assistance and want to use the kiosk,” Monea shares.

The Town of Bolton, Massachusetts, with a population size around 5,000, uses the kiosk similarly. “We offer our kiosk to any applicant who doesn’t have access to a computer, has travelled into Town Hall in pursuit of a permit, or is uncomfortable with technology,” explains Jenny Jacobsen, the Town’s Health and Permitting Assistant. “I can sit with applicants to help them get acclimated.”

Jacobsen is in charge of assisting community members with permit applications. She acts as the point-person for constituent questions for their specific project needs. Which brings us to the second major benefit of kiosks: they reduce staff time spent on troubleshooting, while increasing constituent satisfaction.

Constituent feedback has been very positive,” says Jacobsen. “The best part about our kiosk is that our door doesn’t become a dead end. You can still accomplish what you came in for in the first place.” Monea agrees that in Wooster, Ohio, “nearly all of our customers leave our lobby happy and appreciative of the personal assistance.” 


It is like training wheels. They’ll be riding on their own two wheels before they know it.”

Jenny Jacobsen, Health and Permitting Assistant with Town of Bolton, Massachusetts

Tips for Making the Most of Constituent Interactions at Kiosks

Before you rush off to implement a kiosk program, both Monea and Jacobsen shared a few pieces of sage advance to help ensure success.

Tip #1: Just because you have a kiosk, doesn’t mean constituent questions will stop.

Be sure to have a dedicated staff member who is comfortable with how the technology works and can patiently answer constituent questions and troubleshooting needs. In Wooster, OH, Monea attributes the success of the kiosk to having the right person in seat to walk constituents through the software and answer project-specific questions.

“The critical component is having someone assigned to assist customers who walk in and want to use the kiosk,” explains Monea. “We have an administrative assistant whose responsibility is assisting these customers with the kiosk, scanning submittal documents, as well as helping customers calling in with ViewPoint Cloud questions.”


“It’s not just the kiosk; it’s the person who is helping them use the kiosk to get their task completed. These two things go hand-in-glove.” 

Tim Monea, Chief Building Officer for the City of Wooster, OH

Tip #2: The goal of the kiosk should be to reduce usage over time, but don’t expect usage to stop completely.

The old managerial adage, “Make yourself obsolete,” applies here, meaning kiosks should empower individuals to utilize ViewPoint Cloud’s public-facing application portal on their own, once they become comfortable with the technology.

“While our in-person customers have dramatically declined, we have daily users on the lobby kiosk,” shares Monea. Jacobsen agrees. “While I hope it will enable everyone to become comfortable enough to apply from home, I remind them that they are always welcome to use the kiosk,” she affirms. “I have a few contractors who do come in regularly.”

Tip #3: Leverage kiosks to incentivize “going green” after making the commitment to fully digitize permitting.

Back in 2017, the City of Wooster, Ohio decided to eliminate all paper processes for permitting across their Building, Planning, and Zoning Departments. Today, they do not allow paper applications or construction documents to be accepted. “At the outset we were committed to putting all of our workflow processes in the cloud using ViewPoint,” explains Monea. This includes “all plan reviews, permitting and inspection questions, reports, and other related tasks.” Therefore, kiosks have been vital in making the leap to get all stakeholders on board. 

While the Town of Bolton, Massachusetts hasn’t fully eliminated paper applications, they now assess a fee for permit applications where filers insist on using paper forms. “Use of the kiosk is free,” Jacobsen shares, which incentivizes individuals to utilize ViewPoint Cloud’s public-facing application portal instead to save some money.

Conclusion

The new adaptation of technology help kiosks is perhaps one of the best examples out there to highlight the spirit and character of local government leaders. You care deeply about your constituents and seeing the communities you share grow and thrive. Ultimately, you are there to help. And this strategy allows you to help all constituents—business owners, developers, entrepreneurs, and others—approach permitting, licensing, and code enforcement applications with cheer.

Ready to transition to digital permitting? Ask us how.

10 Smart Questions to Ask Vendors During Your Next IT Procurement Process

Modern technology can transform the way you work in local government, saving time otherwise spent on manual, tedious tasks. Yet any new implementation project needs to be approached with the utmost scrutiny—especially when you consider that approximately 30% of projects are cancelled before they reach completion and another 50% exceed their initial project cost estimate, according to research conducted by The Standish Group.

Throughout our twenty-four years as a company, we’ve been involved in hundreds of procurement discussions from the vendor side. In that time, we’ve realized that the communities who ask us the 10 questions below often have the most success in implementing their new solution. Today, we’re passing that information along to you.

Establish How Customizable the Product Is to Your Specific Needs

1. How easy will it be to make additional updates to the configuration after initial set up?

Most solutions require some degree of preliminary setup. Once that initial newness wears off, be sure you understand whether your team will be able to adapt the solution to evolving needs. For example, do you need the vendor or IT staff to make simple updates to the environment (e.g. updating workflows and forms)?

You should also understand the level of access your internal users will have to dedicated support, in the form of consultants or online help, to answer questions. At ViewPoint Cloud, we have a full-time team dedicated to responding to user questions and requests. Our median response time is just 10 minutes.

2. What are some creative things that we can do with this technology that will make us stand out from neighboring municipalities?

Our workflow automation platform is best-known for streamlining permitting, licensing, code enforcement and inspections—but it also does a lot more than that. The cities and towns we work with consistently invent new and impressive uses like:

  • Adding tax checks to permitting workflows to make sure people can’t get permits until they pay back taxes
  • Creating smart projects that adapt permitting requirements based on an applicant’s specific project criteria 
  • Developing in-depth FAQ sections to help applicants with their requests

Software tools need to be customizable in order to adapt and change with the evolving needs of your community. Make sure you have that flexibility early on.

Know What the Implementation Process Will Look Like—And How Involved Your Team Will Be

3. Does implementation cost extra? 

Certain vendors look to keep costs low by selling their technology solution as a standalone item. They provide no insight on how to best use the tool, how to migrate your historical data into the new software, and they do not offer support for troubleshooting or Q&A. Alternatively, sometimes vendors will sneak in ‘hidden’ implementation or consulting fees after the initial contract is signed.

Our team believes that in order to make the most of your software investment, support is a necessary component of a successful project—not a nice-to-have extra. That’s why we work with communities to create a transparent, customized service plan tailored to support the duration of platform deployment.

4. Are there additional fees for onsite training or consulting time after a certain period?

Depending on the vendor, user training is sometimes included in the cost of the product. Others offer up-front training, but charge for additional engagements after the preliminary onboarding period. Be sure you’re clear on how your potential vendor operates and whether this will impact the overall investment.

5. Will we need to have a dedicated person or team available to ensure successful technology implementation?

In many cases, large-scale technology implementation projects fall to IT staff. If you work on a smaller team, or have a small IT department supporting a large organization, figure out who internally has the capacity to act as the point-person for your project. This individual (or committee) is an instrumental partner in supporting change management and translating priorities internally and externally.

Compare to Other Industry Players

6. How does the speed of development and roadmap of this product compare to industry standard?

Modern technology companies employ roadmaps to visually share their strategic plan and the features they plan to develop next. While this information isn’t always publicly available, it’s worth asking your potential civic technology partner what their product priorities are for the upcoming year. Depending on the vendor, you and your community may even have an opportunity to shape future development through user feedback and recommendations.

7. Are our values aligned with this partner?

A small, but growing cohort of modern technology companies now exist–all focused on bringing about positive change in local government through innovation. We consider ourselves a member of this camp, as we are dedicated to bringing local government leaders best-in-class solutions. It’s worth having the conversation with potential vendors to learn about their history, mission, and motivations for working with local government.

Ask for and Analyze the Results

8. What is this vendor’s track record with other municipalities?

Modern govtech companies will gladly provide you with case studies, impact numbers (including methodology), and success stories because they are proud of their work and the outcomes they were able to bring about.  

9. How would similar communities describe working with you? 

Don’t be afraid to request references when evaluating a new solution. You should speak to a variety of communities to see how the same solution worked in different ways. Speaking directly with users will help you determine whether the technology is a good fit.

10. What is key to a successful implementation and how do I measure that?

Ask your potential technology partner to share what’s needed before, during, and after implementation to ensure success. Are there specific data points that should be collected in advance to best allow you to demonstrate progress using your new solution? If so, ask them how similar communities have tackled this, along with their recommendations as to how you should get started too.

Conclusion

As we explored in our previous blog post, getting enough consensus and internal buy-in to even decide on a technology solution is a major achievement. But after going through all of this up-front effort, you owe it to yourself, your team, and your constituents to ask potential civic technology partners the key questions above. 

Lucky for you, you now have the list! 

Contact Us

617-577-9000
info@viewpointcloud.com

Boston Headquarters
320 Congress St., 5th Floor
Boston, MA 02210

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555 W 5th St., 35th Floor
Los Angeles, CA 90013

High-performance permitting for government agencies

© 2019 ViewPoint Government Solutions

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